Our mind-body is made up of over one hundred trillion cells,

Wholestic: Our mind-body is made up of over one hundred trillion cells, our basic membrane contain the fundamental molecules of our life. Cells are the building block of life; they are what keep us alive. A single cell can survive by itself. However because of our holistic designed cells cooperate and work together to function at high intellectual level… Some cells are specially designed to perform specialized functions as they mature. These cells cooperate with other specialized cells and become the building blocks of our mind-body. Cells are very small, they cooperate together to form tissues organ and system. It would require a sheet of about 10,000 cells to cover the head of a pin, and each of us is composed of more than 75,000,000,000,000 cells. As an individual unit, our cell is capable of metabolizing its own nutrients, synthesizing many types of molecules, providing its own energy, and replicating itself in order to produce succeeding generations of cells.

Cells can be viewed as an enclosed vessel, within which innumerable chemical and biological reactions take place simultaneously. These reactions are under very precise control so that they contribute to the life and procreation of the cell. In the mind-body cells become specialized to perform different functions through the process of differentiation. In order to do this, each cell keeps in constant communication with other cells. As cell receives nutrients from our environment and expels wastes into its surroundings, it adheres to and cooperates with other cells. Cells cooperate together to form tissues, and cooperation between tissues in turn forms organs, which carry out the functions necessary to sustain our life.

Our cells are enclosed by a plasma membrane, which forms a selective barrier that allows nutrients to enter and waste products to leave. The interior of our cell is organized into many specialized compartments, each surrounded by a separate membrane. One major organelle, the nucleus, contains the genetic information necessary for cell growth and reproduction. Each cell contains only one nucleus, whereas other types of organelles are present in multiple copies in the cellular contents, or cytoplasm. Organelles include mitochondria, which are responsible for the energy transactions necessary for cell survival; they are the power plant of the cells, lysosomes which digest unwanted materials within the cell; and the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus, which play important roles in the internal organization of our cell by synthesizing selected molecules and then processing, sorting, and directing them to their proper locations…

In addition, plant cells contain chloroplasts, which are responsible for photosynthesis, whereby the energy of sunlight is used to convert molecules of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) into carbohydrates. Between all these organelles is the space in the cytoplasm called the cytosol. The cytosol contains an organized framework of fibrous molecules that constitute the cytoskeleton, which gives a cell its shape, enables organelles to move within the cell, and provides a mechanism by which the cell itself can move. The cytosol also contains more than 10,000 different kinds of molecules that are involved in cellular biosynthesis, the process of making large biological molecules from small ones.

Cells contain a special collection of molecules that are enclosed by a membrane. These molecules give cells the ability to grow and reproduce. The overall process of cellular reproduction occurs in two steps: cell growth and cell division. During cell growth, the cell ingests certain molecules from its surroundings by selectively carrying them through its cell membrane. Once inside the cell, these molecules are subjected to the action of highly specialized, large, elaborately folded molecules called enzymes. Enzymes act as catalysts by binding to ingested molecules and regulating the rate at which they are chemically altered. These chemical alterations make the molecules more useful to the cell. Unlike the ingested molecules, catalysts are not chemically altered themselves during the reaction, allowing one catalyst to regulate a specific chemical reaction in many molecules.

Biological catalysts create chains of reactions. In other words, a molecule chemically transformed by one catalyst serves as the starting material, or substrate, of a second catalyst and so on. In this way, catalysts use the small molecules brought into the cell from the outside environment to create increasingly complex reaction products. These products are used for cell growth and the replication of genetic material. Once the genetic material has been copied and there are sufficient molecules to support cell division, the cell divides to create two daughter cells. Through many such cycles of cell growth and division, each parent cell can give rise to millions of daughter cells, in the process converting large amounts of inanimate matter into biologically active molecules. Cells are largely composed of compounds that contain carbon. The study of how carbon atoms interact with other atoms in molecular compounds forms the basis of the field of organic chemistry and plays a large role in understanding the basic functions of cells.

Because carbon atoms can form stable bonds with four other atoms, they are uniquely suited for the construction of complex molecules. These complex molecules are typically made up of chains and rings that contain hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms, as well as carbon atoms. These molecules may consist of anywhere from 10 to millions of atoms linked together in specific arrays. Most, but not all, of the carbon-containing molecules in cells are built up from members of one of four different families of small organic molecules: sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids. Each of these families contains a group of molecules that resemble one another in both structure and function. In addition to other important functions, these molecules are used to build large macromolecules.

For example, the sugars can be linked to form polysaccharides such as starch and glycogen, the amino acids can be linked to form proteins, the nucleotides can be linked to form the DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) and RNA (ribonucleic acid) of chromosomes, and the fatty acids can be linked to form the lipids of all cell membranes. Cells communicate by sending and receiving signals. Signals may come from the environment, or they may come from other cells. In order to trigger a response, these signals must be transmitted across the cell membrane. Sometimes the signal itself can cross the membrane. Other times the signal works by interacting with receptor proteins that contact both the outside and inside of the cell.

In this case, only cells that have the correct receptors on their surfaces will respond to the signal. Once inside the cell, the signal continues on its way. Its ultimate destination depends on the nature of the signal, with some signals traveling to the nucleus or to other structures inside the cell. Signals most often move through the cell by passing from protein to protein, each protein modifying the next in some way. Collectively, the proteins that relay a signal to its destination make up a signaling pathway. A signaling pathway can have few or many steps. Some signaling pathways branch out in different directions, sending signals to more than one place in the cell. As a signal is transferred from protein to protein, it can also be amplified. By dividing and amplifying a signal, the cell can convert a small signal into a large response.

Bible verses for today’s meditation and inspiration: Matthew E. McLaren’

Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. Jeremiah 29:12 NIV

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12 NIV

And when you pray, do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words. Matthew 6:7 NIV

The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth. Psalm 145:18 NIV

‘Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.’ Jeremiah 33:3 NIV

“For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them.” Matthew 18:20 NIV

 Let us then approach God’s throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need. Hebrews 4:16 NIV

who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you. Matthew 6:6 NIV

Recommended contacts for prayer request and Bible study

www.agapetemplesda.com

www.adventistontario.org

https://www.hopechannel.com/au/learn/courses

breathoflife.tv/

http://www.nadadventist.org/article/15/contact-us

https://3abn.org/all-streams/3abn.html

https://www.adventist.org/en/utility/contact/

It Is Written

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